Furry Fellas Pet Service LLC

Voted in the TOP dog walking companies in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 & 2011 by Animal Print Readers!
Pet CPR/First Aid Certified
All Experienced Animal Professionals
Serving RI & Parts of MA
Offering..
Dog Walking Service
Pet Sitting Service
In-Home Boarding
Overnight Sitting
Lupine Leashes & Collars & More…

Green Leashes

Providing dog walking and dog waste removal to the greater atlantic county area as well as parts of cape may county.

Canine Athletic Club, Inc

Setting the standard in professional pet care since 1999, CAC delivers a variety of personalized, reliable pet care services designed to enhance the quality of life for you and your pets. Our signature Doggie Day Camp program allows your canine companion to achieve the pack experience and daily exercise he needs to be a happy healthy member of your family. Personalized dog walking and pet sitting services are available 365 days per year. Our stellar team of experienced pet care professionals provide your pets with unparalleled care, exercise and TLC in your absence which affords you peace of mind, increased flexibility and reduced stress Contact us today to schedule a consultation.

CAC is based in Greenwich CT and services the Greater Greenwich CT area as well as Stamford, Darien, New Canaan, Westport, Norwalk, Rowayton, Wilton, Weston and Ridgefield,CT and parts of Westchester County. Please contact us to find out about availability in your area as we continue to expand to bring CAC services to more of Fairfield and Westchester Counties’ pets.

CAC is bonded and insured with impeccable references and is a Member of the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters (NAPPS)

Top 10 City Dog Walker Searches

Someone emailed me asking what the top city searches are for dog walkers on DogWalker.com. I looked through the analytics, and there were literally HUNDREDS of cities searched in the last 30 days, and there have been OVER 5,400 unique visitors… not too shabby for having been online for just about 3.5 months!

Not counting zip codes (where there are several hundred searches a month), here are the top 10 cities where people have been searching for a dog walker using DogWalker.com:

  1. New York City, New York (not counting the boroughs)
  2. Los Angeles, California
  3. San Francisco, California
  4. Chicago, Illinois
  5. Dallas, Texas
  6. Houston, Texas
  7. San Diego, California
  8. Hollywood, Florida
  9. Phoenix, Arizona
  10. Miami, Florida

Safety First

Sari Reis is a pet care professional and owner of Mission Valley Pet Sitting Services in San Diego, California.

As dog walkers we are all familiar with dogs that try to ingest just about everything they see that looks or smells good to them. It could be tossed out food, animal droppings, nuts or seeds, or even dead birds. When walking one dog it is simple to watch where it is sniffing and what it may be trying to eat. With 3, 4 or more dogs, it is easy to miss something and before you know it, one of the dogs is choking on something or has eaten something that could make him ill.

I have often wondered about the dog walkers that you see walking 4, 5 or 6 dogs on leash at once. What would they do in an emergency situation? If one of the dogs is in distress, possibly needs a canine Heimlich maneuver or needs to go to the emergency clinic, what do they do with the rest of the dogs?

The safety and well-being of my client’s pets have been my hallmarks for dog walking and pet sitting since starting my business. At the initial consultation I reassure my clients that I never walk more than one dog at a time unless they are in the same family, and then it is only two at a time. It is not because I cannot physically manage more dogs, but because of the possibility that if something happens to the dog, I want to be able to focus all of my attention on getting that dog whatever help it may need.

Even when being very vigilant I have had dogs pick up something they have found when sniffing under a bush that I couldn’t see. They lift up their heads and I see they are chewing on something. I have no idea what it is but I know that it is something they shouldn’t be eating. I always tell them to “drop it” and some dogs do so immediately. However, some dogs do not and then I have to try and fish it out of their mouths. This can be dangerous if the dogs aren’t completely comfortable with you so you have to be very careful. So far, I have extracted large fruit pits, poop, discarded pieces of clothing and chicken bones from dog’s mouths. All potentially dangerous if swallowed. If I had several dogs to keep an eye on, I wouldn’t be able to perform these maneuvers.

From a strictly financial point of you, I know one can make a lot more money walking several dogs in the same time slot, but I have never and will never compromise a dog’s health for the sake of making more money.

Free Dog Walk in Sunny Isles, Florida

Paws and Dogs, LLC has announced their expansion into Sunny Isles by adding a team member to the area.  It allows pet owners to have peace of mind while on vacation or working late. A healthy pet’s lifestyle depends on daily walks for exercise and socialization.

According to Cesar Millan, a famous dog trainer and Leon F Whitney, D.V.M most dog issues or signs of instability can be modified with daily exercise. Some of the signs of instability are: jumping up on people, running away, obsessive barking, aggressiveness or antisocial behavior towards humans or other dogs. Most times these behaviors come about from boredom and lack of activity. These bad habits develop slowly and can be broken, but not in a short time.

Visits start at $15 for a half hour walk and feed.  To help celebrate their expansion company owner, Ana Bertran, is offering one free walk per household in the area of Sunny Isles.

About Paws And Dogs LLC

Paws And Dogs has been in business for three years, servicing Aventura through Midtown and the Beaches. P&D provides dog walking and pet sitting services, along with supply pick up and drop off at competitive and affordable pricing.  They are members of Pet Sitters International, a Professional Pet Sitters association, are insured and have references in the area.

For more information on the services provided by Paws and Dogs visit http://www.pawsanddogs.com or call 305-496-3709.

Nature’s Variety Pet Food Recall

NatureI want to share an email with you that I received from Nature’s Variety regarding a dog food recall.

=======

Dear Friends – please read these important food safety announcements regarding our raw frozen chicken diets, and scroll down to receive valuable coupons.

Nature’s Variety Voluntarily Expands Recall to Include All Chicken Formula and Organic Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diets with “Best If Used By” Dates On or Before 2/5/11

Nature’s Variety is announcing that out of an abundance of caution, we are voluntarily recalling all Chicken Formula and Organic Chicken Formula products with a “Best If Used By” date on or before 02/5/11.

Nature’s Variety has received new test results from an outside facility that indicate that Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diet with the “Best If Used By” date of 10/29/10 and Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diet with the “Best If Used By” date of 11/9/10 may be contaminated with Salmonella. Therefore, we are voluntarily recalling these date codes of product from the marketplace. Also, out of an abundance of caution, we are expanding our voluntary recall to include all Chicken Formula and Organic Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diets for dogs and cats with any “Best If Used By” date on or before 02/5/11. We believe taking this action is an important and responsible step in order to reinforce consumer confidence and trust.

No other Raw Frozen Diets are involved in this expansion other than chicken, and no other Nature’s Variety products are involved.

The products included in this expanded recall are any Chicken Formula or Organic Chicken Formula Raw Frozen Diet with a “Best If Used By” date on or before 2/5/11, including:
* UPC#7 69949 60130 2 – Chicken Formula 3 lb medallions
* UPC#7 69949 60120 3 – Chicken Formula 6 lb patties
* UPC#7 69949 60121 0 – Chicken Formula 2 lb single chubs
* UPC#7 69949 50121 3 – Chicken Formula 12 lb retail display case of chubs
* UPC#7 69949 60137 1 – Organic Chicken Formula 3 lb medallions
* UPC#7 69949 60127 2 – Organic Chicken Formula 6 lb patties

The “Best If Used By” date is located on the back of the package above the safe handling instructions.

If you have purchased one of the affected products, please return the unopened product to your local retail store to receive a complete refund, or to exchange it for another variety. If your package has been opened, please dispose of the raw food in a safe manner by securing it in a covered trash receptacle. Then, bring your receipt (or the empty package in a sealed bag) to your local retailer for a complete refund or replacement.

As you may know, Nature’s Variety now uses High Pressure Pasteurization on our Raw Frozen Diets as a unique process to kill pathogenic bacteria through high-pressure, water-based technology. Having incorporated this state-of-the-art technology on our Freeze Dried Raw products in late 2009, we were able to confidently implement the process universally on all Raw Frozen Diets after the February 11, 2010 recall in order to further enhance food safety. Nature’s Variety also utilizes a test and hold protocol to ensure that all High Pressure Pasteurized Raw Frozen Diets test negative for harmful bacteria before being released for sale.

“Nature’s Variety believes replacing all raw frozen chicken products on the market with new raw frozen chicken products that use High Pressure Pasteurization is an important and responsible step in order to reinforce consumer confidence and trust,” stated Reed Howlett, CEO of Nature’s Variety. “By recalling all raw frozen chicken products with ‘Best If Used By’ dates on or before 2/5/11, we can provide our pet parents with new raw frozen chicken products that have been processed through High Pressure Pasteurization. Adopting High Pressure Pasteurization is an important step to ensure that our products meet the strictest quality and food safety standards.”

Reed offers this promise to you, “Our commitment to consumers in the future is the same as it’s been in the past – to offer Raw Frozen Diets made from the highest quality ingredients, made in our own plant in the Midwest, by people who care deeply about pet nutrition, health, and happiness.”

If you have additional questions, please call our dedicated Customer Care line 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 800-374-3142. For additional information about High Pressure Pasteurization or other Nature’s Variety food safety protocols, please read the Q&A below or visit www.naturesvariety.com.

Interview with Chicago Dog Walker, Cynthia Slaby

Cynthia Slaby of Chicago PetsCynthia Slaby is the owner and manager of Chicago-Pets, a pet care company she founded in Chicago, Illinois. Prior to starting this company, Cynthia had over 15 years of Advertising and Marketing experience, working on some of the biggest consumer packaged goods and pharmaceutical brands in the world. The aspects of her career that she enjoyed the most were the creativity, strategy and the team environment.

Cynthia was able to see many fantastic campaigns come to light, as well as experience the successes that result from a cohesive team, but something was missing. Cynthia knew that her true calling in life was to nurture and care for animals. Her unconditional love and passion for them were the primary reasons for launching her own professional pet sitting service.

Cynthia’s educational background consists of a B.S. in Public Relations degree from Central Missouri State University. She is a registered member of Pet Sitters International (PSI), volunteer in a medical setting for the Anti-Cruelty Society, and she am certified in Pet First-Aid by the American Red Cross.

Cynthia’s goal is to provide your pets with loving and attentive care and she strives everyday to succeed in providing her human and pet clients with the best quality, stress-free and easiest service possible. Cynthia believes in systems and routines to make sure your pets are safe and secure in their own surroundings, and ensure all her Pet Care Specialists are well trained on these. Cynthia’s pet care expertise will ensure that your loved ones receive the best care possible while you are away!

DogWalker.com: How did you become a pet care professional, and what do you enjoy most about walking dogs?

Cynthia: I spent 15+ years in advertising and marketing. While I liked it, I didn’t love it. I want to love what I do because we spend so much of our time working. My passion for animals is something I’ve always wanted to follow and considered going back to school for veterinary medicine. Long story short, the amount of time and money that would require were not for me. Doing this I could use the skills I obtained as a marketer to grow a business caring for animals — now, I love what I do.

One of the things I love about walking dogs, there are so many, are the smiles they bring to people on the street as we’re walking by. I love the fact that the great majority of people love animals and simply must stop to give a big “hello” — and that my “clients” are always gracious and willing to be adored.

DogWalker.com: How do you deal with dogs that have behavior issues?

Cynthia: This really depends on the behavior issue. I get a thorough history from each client before I begin walking their pup(s) and do everything I can to learn about a specific behavior issue. If it’s a dog that doesn’t like other dogs or children, I look for a low traffic walking path; if it’s a destructive issue I will wear myself out trying to make sure that dog gets a very energetic walk, I often run with them; If it’s an anxiety thing I reassure and talk to the dog the entire time we’re together. I do whatever I can to ensure that pup is as content as possible.

DogWalker.com: Where are your favorite places to take dogs in and around Chicago  and why?

Cynthia: My favorite places are wherever I can find “natural turf” —- I look for grass and soil and head in that direction. A natural setting just seems more calming and gentler on the pads, not to mention they have to provide a lot more interesting scents and smells than concrete!

DogWalker.com: Please share a good story from your dog walking career.

Cynthia: Again, there are so many. It’s not a story really but I do have one wonderfully cute and quirky Shepherd/Sharpei mix, Sam, who does this funny little circle dance thing when I walk with him…he’s constantly walking a few steps, circle, few steps, circle. It’s when he’s excited, which is always the first 5 minutes or so of a walk, and it just cracks me up. I love it.

DogWalker.com: What’s the best way to cope with the crazy Chicago weather?

Cynthia: Gear, a good attitude and making the weather a personal challenge. If you’ve got the gear and the right outlook on things, there are no worries.

DogWalker.com: What sets your company apart from other local dog walking companies?

Cynthia: I like to think of Chicago-Pets as a more of a “boutique” pet sitting service. We’re a very personalized service. I’m not interested in getting really, really big or franchising. We’re very discreet, no logo’d t-shirts are worn by our walkers and sitters. The pets we care for, and their owners, are members of our family, and I’m a nut about making sure that is sincerely demonstrated through very attentive care and customer service.

Another thing is I believe that consistency in care for pets is really important. Pets need consistency just like kids, I think. One, or two tops, Pet Care Specialists are assigned to each pet household. And it’s only two if the frequency of visits requested requires more than 1 person. This is of the utmost importance to me. I can guarantee all of this also because the people who work with me are employees, vs. contractors. What this means is that I can require certain actions of and train my Pet Care Specialists — this is not allowed, by law, if the staff is made up of independent contractors. Consistency is key.

Common Questions About Dog Walking

Billings Dog WalkerTracie Morgan is a Certified Dog Walker, has dog first aid certification, and her B.S. degree in Social Science from Rocky Mountain College in Billings MT.  Tracie operates a dog walking service in Billings, Montana called Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC where she takes up to six dogs in a pack on daily 3 mile off-leash dog hikes to local public access area trails and parks.

1. Why should I have someone walk my dog?

Because a tired dog is a good dog and many behavior issues can be resolved when your dog gets enough daily exercise. Today’s dogs spend long lonely hours at home bored, sleeping, and even overeating. Dogs have a core need for daily activity and a yard where your dog has a place to play is not enough. Dogs do not have the same opinion of our backyards as we do, to a dog a backyard is a large kennel. The truth is that dogs do not self exercise and play when they are left alone. Instead, dogs tend to shut down when they are by themselves because dogs are social animals. A dog’s instincts tell them it is not good to be left alone or isolated from their pack. Dogs are entirely dependent on their humans for proper exercise and it is up to humans to provide adequate amounts of exercise for their beloved canine companions. For humans a well exercised dog means coming home to a calm dog and a nicer dog to be around.

2. Why isn’t my dog fine in the backyard?

One of the greatest misconceptions about dogs is the belief they will be healthy and happy living in the backyard. There is a strong connection between lack of exercise and socialization and behavior problems in dogs. Dogs were bred to perform specific jobs. Because they are not required to do these specific jobs now they need an outlet for their energy, relief from boredom, and time to display the particular characteristics of their breed. Dog’s genetics have prepared them to work, but many dogs are spending their lives confined to monotonous backyards. What are they doing to burn up all that energy? Many are barking, chewing, digging, whining, escaping, howling, and displaying hyperactive behavior. Your neighbors maybe complaining about the barking, escaping, whining, howling, and property destruction.

3. What is a Certified Dog Walker?

A certified dog walker is someone who has trained at a dog walking academy and learned pack management, dog communication and body language, aggression in all its forms: what it means, how to prevent it, and what to do about it, safely and fight protocols, basic training: build reliable recalls, sits, and polite leash behavior. A person who holds this title has learned from lectures, video analysis, demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and fieldtrips. Additionally, to achieve certification they must pass an extensive written test and a thorough field evaluation. A Certified Dog Walker is a trained professional.

4. Why is socialization important for my dog?

Dogs that have not been socialized or had enough experience around other dogs, people, and environments can be problematic. It is important for people to remember domestic dogs are not fully domesticated until they have been adequately trained and socialized. If a dog has only been partially socialized, it is much more dangerous than a wild animal, because wild animals keep their distance from people. Partially socialized dogs live with people and have greater opportunity to act inappropriately with a bite when spooked, frightened, or hurt. The lack of socialization is the major reason dogs become fearful of people, other dogs, other animals, and the environment. Unfortunately, for pet dogs, socialization is often the exception rather than the rule. It is reported that 60% of dog owner’s do not walk their dogs, which means the majority of domestic dogs are isolated in backyards and houses. As a result many of these dogs are unsocialized and are at greater risk of behaving inappropriately.

5. What if my dog is aggressive?

Dog owners often mistake their dogs as not liking other dogs or as aggressive. More often the reality is that the dog is unsocialized with other dogs and is therefore fearful and nervous around other dogs. Additionally, most owners are unwilling to let anxious or aggressive dogs play with other dogs. The dog is poorly equipped to meet the demands of domestic life. Of course, as an adult it will encounter many strange dogs, people, and environments and invariably will react in an antisocial manner. Aggression comes into the picture when the dog encounters something it is not socialized to. Socialization exercises can be conducted to overcome such anxieties towards other dogs, people, and environments. The dog can develop sufficient confidence to readily accept and be comfortable with new dogs, people, and places.

6. What are socialization exercises?

Daily dog walks where your dog experiences the opportunity to regularly interact with other people and dogs is a great socialization exercise. Your dog gets needed social interaction, mental stimulation, positive attention, and exercise. Another socialization exercise is regular dog play, which not only helps prevent aggressive behavior, it also builds confidence, burns off pent up energy, and provides a positive outlet for your dog’s natural instinct to socialize with other dogs. But one of the best ways to socialize your dog is in a walking group such as in a dog socialization and walking pack like those offered by Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC of Billings, Montana; http://www.dogsnsync.com.

Discounting Dog Myths

Billings Dog WalkerTracie Morgan is a Certified Dog Walker, has dog first aid certification, and her B.S. degree in Social Science from Rocky Mountain College in Billings MT. Tracie operates a dog walking service in Billings, Montana called Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC where she takes up to six dogs in a pack on daily 3 mile off-leash dog hikes to local public access area trails and parks.

Many generations of evolution separate dogs and wolves.  It does not make sense for us to learn how to interact with dogs from wolves. It makes about as much sense as learning to parent by watching chimpanzees parent.  But this is what happened when man put unrelated wolves together in captivity and then concluded that domination is normal behavior.  This theory was then superimposed on dogs.

The Natural Wolf Pack

In reality a natural wolf pack is a family unit that consists of an adult alpha male and an adult alpha female and their juvenile offspring and pups.  There are usually about six or seven blood related members in a pack.  The mated alpha male and female are the parents and leaders of their offspring pack just like humans lead and teach their offspring.

David L. Mech, one of the worlds leading wolf experts asserts, “In the natural wolf pack dominance contests with other wolves are rare if they exist at all”.  Dr. Mech also writes in the Canadian Journal of Zoology in 1999, “The typical wolf pack is a family, with the adults guiding the activities of a group in a division-of-labor system”.

Researchers have learned that dominance is rare behavior for wolves and may be a by product of captivity where man put unrelated wolves together.  Dominate behavior in wolves is based on environmental circumstances and is not an instinctual directive.

Cesar Milan

Currently there is controversy and debate going on in dog training circles.  One side represented by Cesar Milan promotes the theory of dogs as wolves and promotes dominance training by pet owners and states there are only leaders and followers in a relationship.  There is dominance or submission, no partnering.  Cesar’s way is a one size fits all approach to dog training.  On his TV program on the National Geographic channel Cesar uses techniques difficult for owners to replicate and uses techniques that could result in injury to the owner or their dog.  That is why National Geographic has a disclaimer that runs at the bottom of the screen warning, “Don’t try this at home”.

Writer Mark Derr whose articles have appeared in Audubon, Natural History, Atlantic Monthly, and other publications and who is the author of critically acclaimed books like Frontiersman and Dog’s Best Friend writes that Cesar’s ethology is outdated.  He further states, “he is a charming one man wrecking ball directed at 40 years of progress in the understanding and shaping dog behavior and in developing non-punitive, reward based training programs, which have led to seeing the dog as an individual, to understand what motivates it, what frightens it, and what its talents and limitations are”.

Many dog training experts are alarmed that Cesar Milan has become the face of dog training and are shaken by the fact that he has taken the world of dog behavior by storm.  More and more concerned dog professionals are becoming increasingly vocal in expressing their disagreement with Cesar’s methods.

Ian Dunbar

The other side of the debate is represented by the renowned and popular Ian Dunbar author of six books on pet training, developer of one of the earliest puppy training courses in the United States (Sirius Puppy Training), holder of a veterinary degree, and a Special Honors in Physiology and Biochemistry from the Royal Veterinary College of London University, a doctorate in animal behavior from the psychology department of UC Berkley, a decade of research, and decades of dog-training experience.

The only things Ian and Cesar both agree on is that all dogs can and should be trained and that dogs need regular and adequate amounts of exercise.  Ian Dunbar believes all training is negotiation and compliance can best be achieved through positive training methods.  His emphasis on positive approaches like lure reward methods using treats and praise has revolutionized the dog training field.  He once ran a behavior clinic for fighting and biting dogs and he is the founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT), an organization with thousands of members.   He was also the star of the British television show “Dogs with Dunbar” and he has hosted a dozen popular videos about dog training.

Ian is not a supporter of using pain and fear in dog training. He does not support using force or intimidation.  He stands solidly in the dog friendly reward based training camp.  Ian Dunbar is being joined by an ever growing number of dog trainers that follow his positive training methods and train force free.  This positive reinforcement method is also the method that is coming out on top of the debate.  Positive training methods are gaining more momentum every year, and positive reinforcement it is where dog training stands today.

Dogs ‘N Sync Walking: 10 Quick Tips

Billings Dog WalkerTracie Morgan is a Certified Dog Walker, has dog first aid certification, and her B.S. degree in Social Science from Rocky Mountain College in Billings MT. Tracie operates a dog walking service in Billings, Montana called Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC where she takes up to six dogs in a pack on daily 3 mile off-leash dog hikes to local public access area trails and parks.

The foundation of dog training is dog walking. Walking your dog is the most important part of training and it forms the cornerstone for all other areas of training.   Many dog owners are at their wits end with their dog’s behavior on the walk and they desperately want things to change.  We have all seen dogs determined to get to another dog, their favorite bush, a fire hydrant, or to people they see in the neighborhood.  We watch as they drag their embarrassed owners around the block.  If you are the owner of a dog that has a mind of its own, not only do you have sore arms but you probably dread walking your dog.

Walking your dog is a great way for you and your dog to get exercise and it is a fun and fulfilling way to improve your relationship with your dog. There is no better way to form a strong bond and fulfill your dog’s core need for regular and adequate amounts of exercise.  Another good reason for walking your dog is because there is a strong connection between lack of exercise and behavior problems in dogs. A lot of behavior issues can be resolved with consistent socialization and exercise. Of course, there are many reasons for problems, but most start with owner’s not having all the information they need to successfully walk their dog.

I am going to give you 10 tips for dog walking but first, I have a question for you….

DO You Know About the APDT?

Chances are you haven’t heard of Ian Dunbar. He is the renowned and popular author of six books on pet training, he developed one of the earliest puppy training courses in the United States (Sirrus Puppy Training), he is the holder of a veterinary degree and a Special Honors in Physiology and Biochemistry from the Royal Veterinary College of London University, he has a doctorate in animal behavior from the psychology department of UC Berkley, he has done a decade of research, he has decades of dog training experience, he is the founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT) an organization with thousands of members, and he has revolutionized the dog training field with positive reinforcement methods.  Ian Dunbar is the dog trainer’s trainer.

A sample of Ian Dunbar Quotes:

Even unwanted behavior offers a wonderful dog training opportunity. Reinforcing the cessation of misbehavior is the training technique of choice when trying to eliminate whining, growling, and running away. Punishment generally exacerbates the problem, making the dog more likely to whine, growl, or run away”   

One of the most magically powerful training techniques is to ignore all unwanted behavior and instead, teach and reinforce good behaviors. Whenever your dog does something you like, simply say, “Good dog” and give him a piece of kibble, some affection, or play a game with him as a reward. For example, reward your dog whenever he sits, lies down, looks at you, stops barking, or just looks cute.”

“You especially want to reward your dog for any sociable or friendly greeting behavior, such as when your dog approaches, wags his tail, wags his butt, sticks out his tongue, raises a paw, or play bows. Sometimes your dog may look like he isn’t doing much. But that’s precisely the point! He may just stand there wagging his tail, but think of all the annoying and worrying things he could have been doing. He could have been barking, snapping, jumping up, or careening around your house like an agility course! So, in a sense, it’s a good idea to reward your dog for not acting fearfully, antisocially, or hyperactively.”

Okay…now for the 10 quick tips:

Dog Walking Tip #1

Collar Placement Needs to be Right. Your dog’s collar needs to be properly

placed on his neck.  Many collars are too loose.  If the dog pulls, a too loose collar easily slips off over the dogs head and the end result is a loose dog who is in harms way or who could cause harm.  The collar must be adjusted enough so it does not slide off if the dog pulls.  You should be able to slide two of your fingers under the dog’s collar.  The collar needs to be placed (and stay) at the top of the dog’s neck.

Dog Walking Tip #2

Think Dog.  Try and view the world from your dog’s outlook.  We have domesticated dogs and brought them into our human world and it is up to us to teach them how to live in our world confidently.  S/He doesn’t know what is unacceptable behavior, unless we tell him, to him it seems okay.  Behaviors that are a problem for us are normal behaviors for them.

Dog Walking Tip #3

Be Consistent. If we want training to stick, everyone in the family has to follow the same rules and enforce the same boundaries and limitations.  When we are consistent in rewarding what we like and when we give constructive feedback of what we don’t like, dogs begin to understand what we want from them.

Dog Walking Tip #4

Keep Your Dog Busy.   Mental stimulation, proper exercise, socialization, and fun games will burn up your dog’s natural energy.  Regular exercise is the key ingredient to good health, good mental agility, and longevity for your dog.  A well exercised dog translates into a happier pet, happier people, and a happier home.  A good dog is a tired dog.

Dog Walking Tip #5

When Your Dog Pulls on the Leash. When your dog begins to pull on the lead immediately stop walking and don’t resume walking until the lead is loose (be a tree).  Slack on the leash means you instantly, again, start moving forward.  If your dog pulls on the lead again, you again stop, and wait for slack on the leash.  It’s okay if it takes you five minutes to get out the door.  Dogs pull because they have been rewarded for pulling.  Somehow it as has been a rewarding experience.  S/He pulls and he gets out the door, or to the other dog, or to your neighbor, or to the car.  Someone somewhere took a step when s/he put tension on the leash.   The idea is to teach your dog he doesn’t get to go where he wants to go when he is pulling.

Dog Walking Tip #6

Find Doggie Friends.  It is very important your dog stays socialized with other dogs; s/he needs to see other dogs regularly or he will be at greater risk of developing behavior issues around other dogs.  Regular exposure to other dogs for play dates or dog socialization walking packs will ensure he keeps his ability to feel comfortable around other dogs in all environments. Dogs that have not been socialized or had enough experience around other dogs, people, and environments can be problematic.  The lack of proper socialization is the major reason dogs become fearful of people, other dogs, other animals, and the environment.

Dog Walking Tip #7

Use Praise and Reward.  Be positive and stay calm (no yelling).  Reward behaviors you want and there is a very good chance those behaviors will be repeated.  When an unwanted behavior occurs use a time out to remove your dog, or use sounds to interrupt the behavior, or refocus your dog on something more constructive, or ignore the behavior (such as jumping up), so the behavior is not reinforced and it eventually stops.  If your dog is on a lead and desperate to get to another dog, bench, fire hydrant, or person, quickly turn in a different direction or in the opposite direction, so your dog will not be rewarded by reaching the target.  Throw a praise party for your dog when he displays the behavior you are looking for and want repeated.

Dog Walking Tip #8

Do Not Use Dominate the Dog. Do not use pain, fear, force, intimidation or domination.  Outdated training methods by traditional trainers would like you to believe dogs are behaving badly and trying to be dominant over their owners.  Few dogs are actually attempting to be dominant over their owners; mostly they are displaying their insecurities or fears, which can be overcome with understanding and patience.  Punishment has no place when teaching what behaviors we desire and what behaviors we want to end.  Positive reinforcement training methods are easier, more effective, more enjoyable, and more efficient, plus your dog will learn better and retain information longer.  You also build a better relationship with your dog.

Dog Walking Tip #9

Be Aware. Keep a look out for what is going on ahead of you when you are walking your dog.  If you know your dog tends to lunge at other dogs, or likes to chase a cyclist, or run to a group of playing children, you should be prepared ahead of time with a plan of action.  You could have your dog sit and keep sitting until the distraction passes by, or you could change your direction.  Practice sitting first by having your dog sit for a treat on walks when nothing is happening and there are no distractions.

Dog Walking Tip #10

Exercise it vital. Make sure you do training after your dog has been adequately exercised.  If pulling is a problem, there are no-pull harnesses that come in a variety of styles.  You may need to try more than one style to find one that works best for you.  Some, like the Gentle Leader Easy Walk harness attach to a leash at the point of your dogs chest and make it more difficult for your dog to pull.  Others use straps that go under the dogs front legs and tighten when he pulls, such as the Sporn No Pull Halter.  Still others are head halters like the Gentle Leader, but with a head halter it is important to desensitize your dog to the head halter gradually by associating the halter with treats and also rewarding when the dog is not trying to get the halter off by pawing at it.  Be patient while your dog gets used to it.

Lastly, it is reported that 60% of dog owners do not to walk their dogs.  The majority of dogs are spending their lives trapped in monotonous back yards and houses.  Just because your dog is outside in the yard does not mean he is getting enough exercise.  Dogs do not self exercise and play when they are by themselves.  If you sit down to watch TV or read and your dog is snoozing beside you or chewing a bone, your dog has probably had enough exercise that day.  If not, and he is getting into mischief or bugging you to play, then he has not had enough exercise.  It is up to humans to provide adequate amounts of exercise for their beloved canine companions.

Walking your dog is low cost, popular, provides stress relief and support, offers health

giving exercise, and is life giving and beneficial.  Your dog was born ready – let’s walk.

McElroy Pet Care

“I sit, I stay,
So You Can Play”

Can’t get home for that mid-day walk or snack? I’ll do it!
Going on a trip? I’ll bring in your papers and mail, and keep your favorite furry friends company. Just let me know how I can help.

McElroy Pet Care serves Louisville’s pets with walks, home visits, vet/groomer taxi service, and loving care.

What Exercise Does for Your Dog and What You Get in the Bargain

Billings Dog WalkerTracie Morgan is a Certified Dog Walker, has dog first aid certification, and her B.S. degree in Social Science from Rocky Mountain College in Billings MT. Tracie operates a dog walking service in Billings, Montana called Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC where she takes up to six dogs in a pack on daily 3 mile off-leash dog hikes to local public access area trails and parks.

Because of the long work hours and busy lives people lead today their canine companions spend long lonely hours at home bored, sleeping, and even overeating. Dogs are companion animals and an important part of our culture, our family, and our community life. People have a strong historical relationship with dogs and over time dogs have become more than canine companions. People derive both physical and mental health benefits from their relationships with dogs; dogs have become an important part of our society. Dogs provide many stress relieving and health benefits, such as social support and stress relief.

Effects of Exercise on Behavior
Also important to the health and welfare of people and dogs is the need for daily activity. With more people becoming health conscious, it is well known that exercise is a good thing for human bodies, and, of course, that goes for dogs too. Exercise tones muscles, builds strong bones, improves circulation, can improve bone and joint health; can improve heart and lung function, helps weight loss, helps prevent early death, improves mental state, promotes healthy rest, helps prevent depression, and in dogs, reduces the incidence of digestive problems and constipation.

It is well known that people do not get enough exercise and it is no surprise that dogs are not getting enough exercise either. There is a strong connection between lack of exercise and behavior problems in dogs. Dogs were bred to perform specific jobs. Because they are not required to do these specific jobs now they need an outlet for their energy, relief from boredom, and time to display the particular characteristics of their breed.

Dogs’ genetics have prepared them to work, but many dogs are spending their lives confined in monotonous back yards. What are they doing to burn all that built up natural energy? Many are barking, chewing, digging, whining, escaping, howling, and displaying hyper-active behavior.

A Tired Dog is a Good Dog
A lot of these behavior issues can be resolved with consistent socialization and exercise. When dogs don’t get the exercise they need it is causes problems for dog owners and their communities. Regular exercise is the key ingredient to good health, good mental agility, and longevity for your dog.

A well exercised dog translates into happier people, happier pet, and fewer medical expenses. However, the truth is that dogs do not self exercise and play when they are left alone. Instead, dogs tend to shut down when they are by themselves because dogs are social animals.

A dog’s instincts tell them it is not good to be left alone or isolated from their pack. Dogs are entirely dependent on their humans for proper exercise, food, and health care. It is up to humans to provide adequate amounts of exercise for their beloved canine companions. For humans, a well exercised dog means coming home to a calm dog and a dog nicer to be around.

Story by Tracie Morgan, CDW
Dogs ‘N Sync, LLC

Partnership for Animal Welfare, Inc., Exercise Benefits. Retrieved March 29, 2008, from DogTip Exercise Benefits Web site:
http:/www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_ExerciseBenefits

Butler, Joy (April 22, 2007). Doggy Fitness Exercise Checklist. Retrieved March 29, 2008, from Doggy Fitness Exercise Checklist:
Daily Active Routine Benefits Web site: http:/dog-care.suite101.com/article.cfm/doggy_fitness

Scott. M.S., Elizabeth How Owning a Dog or Cat Can Reduce Stress. Retrieved March 29, 2008, from Health Benefits of Pets – How
Owning a Dog or Cat Can Reduce Stress Web site: http:/stress.about.com/od/lowstresslifesytle/a/petsand stress.

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives